Summer Semester Courses

Summer Semester at Assumption: Small Classes, Reduced Cost
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Assumption's online and summer day courses provide students the opportunity to complete a semester-long course in six weeks with smaller class sizes at a reduced cost per course. Whether a student seeks to accelerate his/ her degree program, catch up, or simply focus on a particular course, this is an opportunity worth exploring. Online registration will open on April 8, 2019. Click here to receive an email when summer registration opens.

The courses offered during the summer are the same versions as their fall or spring semester counterparts, taught by the same professors, and provide the same level of intellectual rigor. As such, no special permission is needed for Assumption students to “count” these courses as part of their curriculum. The only real difference is the summer classes cost less than the fall and spring versions.

SESSION I: May 20 - June 28, 2019
   
COURSE INSTRUCTOR ONLINE OR ON CAMPUS
Matters and Mysteries of Your Brian  Anthony Sacino On Campus
Elementary Functions Bill Katcher On Campus
Calculus I Suzanne Kozak On Campus
Socrates and the Search for Truth Tom Miles On Campus
Logic Paul Bohan-Broderick On Campus
Principles of Accounting I Joe Foley Online
Cultural Anthropology Justin Williams Online
History of Western Art Elissa Chase Online
Principles of Macroeconomics Tom White Online
Statistics Brian Volz Online
English Composition Christopher Gilbert Online
Survey of British Literature I Kristen Carella Online
Intro. to Health, Human and Rehabilitation Christian Scannell Online
Human Development and Disability Christian Scannell Online
Rehab Strategies & Interventions Sarah DeSouza Brown Online
Psychiatric Rehabilitation Andrea Randall Online
Introduction to Literature Rachel Ramsey Online
Decision Analytics Bryan Coleman Online
Purchasing and Supply Management Kevin Kelly Online
Sport Management Libby O’Hara Online
Principles of Marketing Paul Bailey Online
Public Relations Megan Hill Online
Digital Marketing Strategies Zach Daniels Online
General Psychology Regina Kuersten-Hogan Online
Psychology of Learning Karen Lionello-Denolf Online
Psych of Dev: Inf. & Childhood Maria Kalpidou Online
Spanish II Esteban Loustaunau Online
The Problem of God Ty Monroe Online
Moral Theology Christopher Klofft Online
     
SESSION II: July 1 - August 9, 2019    
     
Elementary Functions Suzanne Kozak On Campus
Socrates and the Search for Truth Paul Bohan-Broderick On Campus
Ethics and the Good Life Tom Miles On Campus
Principles of Accounting II Bryan Coleman Online
Approaches to Reading and Interpret. Paul Shields Online
International Management Eric Drouart Online
Introduction of Management Kevin Kelly Online
Social Media Marketing Zach Daniels Online
Sports Marketing Libby O’Hara Online
Global Pop Peter Clemente Online
Abnormal Psychology Adam Volungis Online
Psychology of Adolescence and Maturity Fang Zhang Online
Spanish III Juan Carlos Grijalva Online
The Problem of God Ty Monroe Online
     
     
     

 

Summer I (May 20 - June 28, 2019)

BIO 115 MATTERS AND MYSTERIES OF YOUR BRAIN

The brain is the most complex and least understood organ in our bodies. It is fascinating to consider that the brain is required for a vast array of functions including learning and memory, motor movement, and perception of our environment. The brain’s vital role in our daily life is indisputable, yet we do not fully understand the fundamental underpinnings of brain function. For this reason, the brain is referred to as the last frontier of science.  In this course, student-driven approaches will be used to explore what is known and what is not yet fully understood about brain function through the use of case studies of humans suffering from brain injury, hypothesis-driven experimentation, and critical examination of recent science findings as described by the media. Students will refine their practice of the scientific method while enhancing critical thinking skills. Lab fee: $200 starting in 2018-19. This course fulfills the Core curriculum science requirement for the Class of 2020 and after.

MAT 114 ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS
A survey of those topics in algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry which provide the background for the study of calculus. Topics to be covered include exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers and polynomial functions, trigonometry, plane analytic geometry, and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Not open to those who have completed MAT 117 or 131. Prerequisite: MAT 111 or departmental permission through placement. Counts in the Core Curriculum Requirements as Mathematics Group A. If only one Mathematics course is taken to fulfill the Core requirement in Mathematics, it must be at this level or higher. 

MAT 117 CALCULUS I
An introductory course in differential calculus. Topics to be covered include limits and continuity, the derivative and applications, and an introduction to integration. Not open to those who complete MAT 131. Prerequisite: MAT 114 or department permission through placement. 

PHI 100 SOCRATES AND THE SEARCH FOR TRUTH
This course introduces students to the activity of philosophy, understood in the Socratic sense of living an examined life. Philosophy begins by questioning ordinary experience and the opinions one already holds, and it becomes a comprehensive, fundamental, and self-reflective search for the truth about the nature of human beings and the good life, the world, and God. Readings include Plato’s Apology of Socrates and the Allegory of the Cave, as well as at least one medieval and one modern text. This course also introduces elementary principles of logical reasoning and basic distinctions of philosophic importance. It serves as the first half of a core seminar, and each section includes some direct link with the content pursued in each of the intermediate core courses in philosophy.

PHI 210 LOGIC
This course examines the principles of formal and informal reasoning. Students examine validity, soundness, deduction, induction, and probabilistic reasoning, and the relation between logical form and truth. Topics may include classical syllogistic logic, propositional logic, predicate logic, modal logic, and fallacies. The course may also examine the relations between logic and ordinary language, science, mathematics, or metaphysics. This course is required for the LEX minor. Prerequisite: PHI 100 and any intermediate PHI course (151–154); may be taken concurrently with intermediate course.

ACC 125 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
An introduction to accounting concepts for financial reporting. Accounting theories and principles relative to asset valuation, liability reporting, and income determination will be examined. The uses and limitations of external financial reports will be emphasized. 

ANT 131 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
This course will be an overview of the discipline of cultural anthropology, introducing the student to diverse cultures around the globe through reading and analysis of anthropologists’ writings about their work. Readings will show that humans in different cultures have developed different solutions to the same problems. Emphasis will be placed on techniques for learning about other cultures, and the theories and concepts used to understand why humans behave as they do. This course counts as a social science in the Core Curriculum.

ARH 125 HISTORY OF WESTERN ART
How long have humans been creating art? What makes the Mona Lisa the Mona Lisa? Why is Picasso so famous? This course answers such questions by surveying the development of art in the West from prehistoric times to the present day. Through illustrated lectures and in-class discussion we will consider what purposes art serves, why it changes, and how artistic change is linked to political and social developments. At the same time, close study of individual works will introduce the skills needed to identify works of art and decode the imagery they contain. For classes prior to 2020, this course satisfies the Core requirement in Art, Music and Theatre. For the class of 2020 and subsequent classes, this course fulfills the Core requirement for a fine art in Culture and Expression. For all, it serves as a gateway to a minor in Art History.

ECO 111 PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS
An analysis of the basic theory of aggregate economic activity and the application of the theory to current policy problems. Topics include national income accounting, the determinants of the level of income and employment, money and banking, fiscal and monetary policies, and economic growth and stability. Prerequisite: ECO 110. 

ECO 115 STATISTICS
The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding on an introductory level of how statistical inferences are made in the face of uncertainty. The underlying role of probability is stressed. A secondary purpose is the application of various test designs to formulate research questions. These designs include: t tests, analysis of variance, chi square analysis, and linear regression. (Counts as a second math course in the core curriculum) MA114 must be taken prior to or at the same time as ECO115. Prerequisite: CSC113 or CSC110 or successful completion of test-out. 

ENG 130 ENGLISH COMPOSITION
This writing course emphasizes planning, composing, and revising. Specifically, the course deals with strategies for generating ideas, recognizing audience, clarifying purpose, focusing on a perspective, and choosing effective arrangements of ideas. Techniques of revision, which are central to the course, focus on appropriateness of language and effectiveness of development, as well as on editing. Counts in the Core Curriculum as a Core Seminar, to be taken in the same year as LTE140, in either order. 

ENG 221 SURVEY OF BRITISH LITERATURE I: BEGINNINGS TO THE 18TH CENTURY
This course provides a broad overview of English literature from the Middle Ages to the late eighteenth century. We will read a variety of texts, construct historical and cultural contexts, debate issues of periodization and canonization, and consider questions of genre and innovation. Prerequisite: Complete ENG 130 and any Introduction to Literature.

HRS 119  INTRODUCTION TO Health, HUMAN and rehabilitation SERVICES
This course is an introduction to the theory, practice and systems of health, human and rehabilitation services. The information covered in this course is geared toward students in all majors so that they may become more socially, politically, culturally and humanly aware of the issues that people with disabilities, chronic illnesses and challenging life circumstances experience. This course utilizes social justice frameworks to consider the barriers and inequities faced by individuals typically marginalized, disenfranchised and limited from full participation in society. The history, legislation and mission of health, human and rehabilitation services will be examined along with the major models and theories of helping and providing services in community-based health and human service agencies. Current issues and trends in health, human and rehabilitation service provision are covered with specific attention paid to disability and chronic illness. This course fulfills the social science requirement in the Core Curriculum. 

HRS 121 HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND DISABILITY ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
This course will cover the basic principles of developmental theories in addition to the major theories of human growth and development. Piaget, Erikson, Bronfenbrenner, Maslow and Kohlberg are some of the theorists studied in this course. Demographic shifts across history are identified with the intent of demonstrating the increased population of individuals living and living longer with chronic illness and disability. Typical development across the lifespan is studied with each stage of life covered from pregnancy and infancy to older adulthood. Disabilities and chronic illnesses common to each stage of life will be studied with discussion of the ways in which the disability and illness experience affects passage through life stages. This course fulfills the social science requirement in the Core Curriculum. 

HRS 219 REHABILITATION STRATEGIES AND INTERVENTIONS
This course explores the full range of rehabilitation strategies and interventions that occur across the lifespan of individuals with disabilities. Educational and rehabilitation strategies aimed at maximizing independence for people with disabilities will be covered. Early intervention, inclusion and transition services will be examined as critical educational strategies aimed at minimizing the impact of disability and enhancing independence. The course will provide critical knowledge and skills related to employment and independent living options for people with disabilities including related legislation. Supportive strategies for assisting and maintaining individuals with disabilities in educational and employment settings will be addressed. Rehabilitation and assistive technology options will also be covered.

HRS 320 PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION
As an introduction to psychiatric rehabilitation, this course emphasizes understanding of lifespan development with appreciation for the complex interaction of biological, social and psychological variables that influence human behavior. From this bio-psycho-social framework, the course will review major psychiatric and developmental disorders with attention to diagnostic and intervention strategies. This course will also address the co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders in individuals. The challenging nature of treatment and rehabilitation for individuals with co-occurring disorders will be identified and covered. Educational and vocational factors will also be covered. Students will gain an understanding and appreciation of the personal experience of psychiatric disability and recovery, including an understanding of the core principles and motives of psychiatric rehabilitation. Prerequisites: HRS 119; HRS 121 

MGT 230 DECISION ANALYTICS FOR MANAGERS
In an increasingly complex world, decision analysis has a major role to play helping produce insight and promote creativity to help decision-makers make better decisions. Business analytics are becoming a critical capability for enterprises of all types, for profit or non-profit, domestic or international. Solving organizational problems requires understanding of many functional areas, including marketing and sales, human resources, accounting, operations, engineering and others. In this course students will gain knowledge of theory and practical applications of decision analysis. Using cases, students will identify pertinent information, perform analysis using key tools including analytical software, and develop effective solutions supported by data. Concepts we will explore include, decision trees, probability, risk assessments, group decision-making, resource allocation and scenario planning. Prerequisites: MGT 100, ECO 115 or PSY 224 or SOC 300.

MGT303 PURCHASING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the planning and controlling of the total flow of materials through an organization. Topics to be covered included purchasing, quality assurance, sources of supply, international buying, contracts and pricing practices, negotiation, make or buy decisions, institutional and governmental purchasing, legal considerations, computer-based systems, traffic, receiving, storage, and control of materials and final products so that usage of personnel, facilities, and capital is optimized. Case studies will enhance learning objectives. 

MGT 342 SPORT MANAGEMENT
Sport has become a multibillion dollar industry, and as such, requires increasingly sophisticated and innovative management. This course introduces students to the business of sport. Students will learn the concepts, principles, and practices of managing sport organizations and sporting events as well as gaining an overview of the sport industry. This course builds on the skills and knowledge from an introductory management and organization course as students learn to apply organizational, management, and leadership principles to sport organizations. Students will also study change and innovation in both sport organizations as well as the sport industry. Prerequisite: MGT 100

MKT 101 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
This introductory course assesses the impact of environmental forces on the practice of marketing. Students will learn the fundamentals of the marketing mix. The course covers the following: target market identification, market research, consumer behavior, product positioning, distribution, communications (personal selling, advertising, sales promotion, and public relations), and pricing decisions. Ideally, should not be taken in same semester as MGT 100. Bailey, Daniels, DeWitt, Drouart, Hill, LeBlanc, Leonard, O’Hara/Three credits

MKT 316 PUBLIC RELATIONS
This is a practitioner-level course which melds business goals and the writing process to deliver a set of skills which bridges the information gap between organizations and their publics. Topics include: Basics of Style, Media Relations, Press Releases, Brochures, Newsletters, Magazines, Annual Reports, Media Copy Writing, Speech Writing, and the use of Web Pages. Prerequisite: MKT 101.

MKT 326 DIGITAL MARKETING STRATEGIES
This course is designed to teach students how to integrate the Internet into marketing and business communication functions. The objective of this course is to increase students’ understanding of the complexity of marketing goods and services on the Internet. This will be accomplished through an analysis of the technology from a marketing/communication perspective. Students will study the concepts and business models of electronic commerce as these relate to the development and implementation of successful Internet strategies. Prerequisite: MKT 101.

PSY 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
In this introduction to psychology, students learn the language, methods, theoretical perspectives, and research of the discipline. This course introduces students to a range of topics within psychology, such as the biological and social bases of behavior, as well as basic principles of perception, learning, and motivation. This course counts as a social science in the Core Curriculum requirements. 

PSY 253 PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a grounding in important principles of learning, such as conditioning, extinction, generalization, and discrimination. The behavioral approach of B.F. Skinner is predominant throughout the course, although the concepts of important learning theorists such as Thorndike, Tolman, and Hull are also presented. In addition, the philosophical underpinnings of a learning-based model of human behavior and the complex questions of freedom and determinism raised by modern behaviorism are addressed in the course. 

PSY 290 PSYCHOLOGY OF DEVELOPMENT: INFANCY AND CHILDHOOD
This course examines human growth and development during infancy and childhood. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between theory, research, and the application of knowledge in child development. Different theoretical perspectives (psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive-developmental); current research on selected topics (e.g., day care, cross-cultural differences in child rearing); and ways to encourage optimal growth in children at home, with friends, and at school are reviewed. This course counts as a social science in the Core Curriculum requirements. 

PSY 330 POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY: PSYCHOLOGY OF WELL-BEING
This course explores contemporary research in positive psychology, neuroscience, and psychology of religion on how spirituality (mindfulness, meditation, religion), and positive emotions, activities, and traits impact well-being. This course invites students to understand factors that allow an individual to thrive and lead a meaningful and fulfilling life. Students will read both science and non-science sources to understand the neuroscience that lends empirical validation to our understanding of what constitutes a “good life”. Students will also participate in experiential exercises to apply course concepts to their own lives, develop knowledge to live well, and contribute to their communities. This course helps students integrate knowledge across specializations in psychology (positive psychology, psychology of religion, neuroscience) as well as across disciplines (e.g., philosophy and theology). Students will be challenged to think about how the claims of faith can be integrated with and/or compared to science as they explore the complementarity of faith and reason.

SPA 102 SPANISH II
This course is the second part of the beginning sequence offering students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of vocabulary and grammatical structures. The course provides an integrated approach in which listening, speaking, reading and writing are developed. The course fosters awareness of Hispanic cultures through short readings and a variety of oral and written activities. Prerequisites: SPA 101, or one or two years of high school

THE 202 MORAL THEOLOGY
No one can live a genuinely human life without asking the question “How should I live and what kind of life will make me happy?” This course introduces students to the unique way in which theology goes about answering the question of human flourishing. Moral theology is not so much preoccupied with drafting ethical and legal codes, but rather with shedding light on those actions that respond to the deepest aspirations of the human heart. Beginning with the premise that human beings need to be related to God if they are to be truly happy, this class invites students to think about what it would mean to live a morally serious human life. Prerequisite: THE 100 and one THE150s course.

Summer II (July 1 - August 9, 2019)

MAT 114 ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS
A survey of those topics in algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry which provide the background for the study of calculus. Topics to be covered include exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers and polynomial functions, trigonometry, plane analytic geometry, and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Not open to those who have completed MAT 117 or 131. Prerequisite: MAT 111 or departmental permission through placement. Counts in the Core Curriculum Requirements as Mathematics Group A. If only one Mathematics course is taken to fulfill the Core requirement in Mathematics, it must be at this level or higher. 

PHI 100 SOCRATES AND THE SEARCH FOR TRUTH
This course introduces students to the activity of philosophy, understood in the Socratic sense of living an examined life. Philosophy begins by questioning ordinary experience and the opinions one already holds, and it becomes a comprehensive, fundamental, and self-reflective search for the truth about the nature of human beings and the good life, the world, and God. Readings include Plato’s Apology of Socrates and the Allegory of the Cave, as well as at least one medieval and one modern text. This course also introduces elementary principles of logical reasoning and basic distinctions of philosophic importance. It serves as the first half of a core seminar, and each section includes some direct link with the content pursued in each of the intermediate core courses in philosophy.

PHI 151 ETHICS AND THE GOOD LIFE
Each person must confront the question, How should I live? In doing so, one may also wonder, Do the ends justify the means? Are intentions all that count? Is God the source of right and wrong? How important are my desires? Many things seem good that later prove to be evil or merely incomplete goods for the human being. This course uses classic texts to investigate common opinions about the human good in light of our need to distinguish apparent goods from true goods. Ultimately, what is it to live well? Texts include Aristotle’s Ethics and readings from the utilitarian and the Kantian traditions. Prerequisite: PHI 100.

ACC 126 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II
A consideration of some of the more complex areas of financial accounting and an introduction to managerial accounting and its role in the planning and control of business operations. Changes in financial position, analysis of financial statements, cost accounting, and budgeting will be examined. The impact of accounting information on internal decision making will be emphasized. Prerequisite ACC125.

ENG 130 ENGLISH COMPOSITION
This writing course emphasizes planning, composing, and revising. Specifically, the course deals with strategies for generating ideas, recognizing audience, clarifying purpose, focusing on a perspective, and choosing effective arrangements of ideas. Techniques of revision, which are central to the course, focus on appropriateness of language and effectiveness of development, as well as on editing. Counts in the Core Curriculum as a Core Seminar, to be taken in the same year as LTE140, in either order. 

ENG 220 APPROACHES TO READING AND INTERPRETATION
This writing emphasis course considers fundamental issues of textual interpretation, primarily but not exclusively in the print media. Representative readings, limited in number, will be chosen from a variety of genres and historical periods. In addition to adopting a critical vocabulary that will assist close reading of texts, the course also introduces the student to various interpretive strategies: formalist, historical, reader-response, structuralist, and deconstructionist, among others. Required for all English Majors. Prerequisite: Complete ENG 130 and any Introduction to Literature. 

INB 307 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT
This course provides an in-depth examination of the managerial issues confronting managers as they plan, organize, staff, and control global/transnational operations. The basic premise is that management in a global environment differs in many ways from management of a firm doing business within national boundaries. Specific topics include the cultural context of international business, planning, implementation, personnel selection, labor relations, communication, motivation, control, and ethics/social responsibility. The course includes readings, lectures, cases, experiential exercises, and discussions. Prerequisites: MGT 100, MKT 101, and Junior/Senior standing or permission of instructor. 

MGT 100  INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
This course introduces a systems approach to managing organizations and focuses on the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling tasks and functions of managers. Students are given the opportunity to development key managerial skills such as self-management, team management and organizational management that support effective performance. The course includes an introduction to basic Microsoft Excel, Word, and presentation software for business communication. Ideally, MGT 100 should not be taken in same semester as MKT 101.

MKT 327 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
This course will cover one of the fastest growth areas within the marketing discipline—social media marketing. Over the last half dozen years, organizations have shifted more of their marketing expenditures from traditional to digital marketing campaigns. And, within digital marketing, expenditures for campaigns that involve social media tactics have grown exponentially. Although specific social media platforms or channels such as MySpace, Facebook or Twitter may come and go; the underlying principles behind social media of engaging present and potential customers with content that they want to share with others are here to stay. Prerequisite: MKT 101

MKT 344 SPORTS MARKETING
Students electing this course explore the various segments of the sports business in the United States and around the world. The course utilizes the basic elements of strategic marketing (consumer, product, price, place, and promotion) and relates them to the business of sports. Topics include the consumer as a sports participant and spectator, the fan cost index, sponsorships, endorsements, event marketing, sports advertisements, sports media, sporting goods, lifestyle marketing, and more. Prerequisite: MKT101.

MUS 126 GLOBAL POP
A category of ethnomusicology, Global Pop explores musical traditions from a variety of nations with an emphasis on the popular music industry in each. This course examines the forces that enable the movement of music and musicians around the world and that give global music its persuasive power. Topics include music as expressive culture, music production, ethnicity and identity in pop music, music as symbol, cross-cultural collaborations in popular music, and music as a force that transcends sociological, political and national boundaries. For classes prior to 2020, this course satisfies the Core requirement in Art, Music and Theatre. For the class of 2020 and subsequent classes, this course fulfills the Core requirement for a fine art in Culture and Expression, and counts in the Core as a Global Awareness course.

PSY 216 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course provides students with a detailed description and analysis of the forms of behavior seen as abnormal in our contemporary culture. Research relevant to and theoretical perspectives on these disorders are presented. Throughout the course students are asked to consider the implications of being labeled abnormal and to apply their knowledge to individual cases. 

PSY 281 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADOLESCENCE AND MATURITY
The course will examine a wide range of issues in adolescence, such as historical perspectives on adolescence; biological changes; cognitive development; parenting styles and family dynamics; moral development; drug abuse; and psychological disorders of adolescence. The issues will be illustrated and further developed through the use of several case studies. 

SPA 201 SPANISH III
Continued development of communicative competency in Spanish language and Hispanic culture including a variety of media. Prerequisite: SPA 102, or two or three years of high school Spanish, or equivalent. Media fee $15. 

THE 150 THE PROBLEM OF GOD
This course uses a variety of theological, philosophical, and literary works, including Augustine’s The City of God, to examine what the twentieth-century American theologian John Courtney Murray called “the problem of God.” That problem focuses on the challenge that the idea of God, in general, and the Christian understanding of God, in particular, poses to the human mind. This course fulfills the second theology requirement in the core curriculum program.